Latest research

How the National Register is helping push new frontiers in research

Evaluating advanced breast cancer treatment and survival

Breast Cancer Foundation NZ commissioned a report, “I’m still here”: Insights into living - and dying - with Advanced Breast Cancer (ABC) in New Zealand, which was released in September 2018. This report includes statistical analysis of National Register data about ABC treatment and survival.

Key findings

  • Median survival after diagnosis of metastatic / advanced breast cancer (ABC) in New Zealand is 16 months, considerably worse than overseas
  • One and five-year survival rates are also worse in New Zealand than overseas, with the gap widening in recent years
  • The Māori five-year survival rate is significantly worse than non-Māori

These research findings support advocacy by Breast Cancer Foundation NZ to help address these inequities.

Read the Executive Summary here.

Download the full report

Extending mammography screening age coverage

This study provided evidence that extending mammography screening (BreastScreen Aotearoa) to include women aged from 69 to 74 years, will improve patient outcomes. Lobbying for the age extension is in progress.

Read the full report

Improving future surgical practice

A recent research study has found that increasing margins for tumor clearance from international guidelines of 1mm to 2mm will improve breast cancer patient outcomes in New Zealand.

Identifying inequities in patient care

A Waikato study is investigating how breast cancer is diagnosed and treated in different regions, and patients' survival in these regions. The goal is to learn where areas of need are, so that New Zealand can improve equity in breast cancer care.

Read about the research

Promoting screening for Pasifika women

Ross Lawrenson's research on the National Register is helping promote screening for Pasifika women, and improve their outcomes for breast cancer.

Pacific Breakfast Radio recently interviewed Ross on his research, which you can listen to below. You can see Ross' research using data from the National Register here.

Listen to the interview